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Torn Light Records
356 Ludlow Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45220
513-873-6995
Monday - Saturday
11:00AM - 8:00PM

Sunday
11:00AM - 5:00PM

Daniel Schmidt – In My Arms, Many Flowers

Only 1 left in stock

$14.00

What our staff has to say: “Some of the most beautiful music I’ve ever heard. If you’re a local expect to hear me jamming this 3x a week at least. MUST HAVE FOR ALL.” – Kobe

“I’m a huge fan of Gamelan Music, the large arrangements and flowing in a wave of tone reels you in. Long ringing low notes combined with an almost chaotic anthem of notes in a higher key, layers upon layers. Daniel Schmidt uses this instrument beautifully, and introduces it within the school of American minimalism and new music movement. Take a dive into more traditional Gamelan music and check out ‘Golden Rain’ on Nonsuch Records.” – Dan

Recital is proud to publish the first album of American Gamelan composer Daniel Schmidt (b. 1942). Schmidt, who emerged in the Bay Area music scene in the 1970s, wove the threads of traditional Eastern Gamelan music together with American Minimalism (repetitive music). Schmidt was (and is still) a prime figure in the development of American Gamelan music – studying and collaborating with Lou Harrison, Jody Diamond, and Paul Dresher. He currently is a teacher at Mills College, teaching instrument building.

The recordings on Flowers date from 1978 – 1982, selected directly from Schmidt’s personal cassette archive. It holds two studio tracks, along with two live performances. The first track, Dawn (commissioned by composer John Adams), employs an early digital sampler provided by Pauline Oliveros. It holds the sound of a string quartet. The nature of this piece is breathtaking, an ocean of strings pulsing beneath the gliding bells of the gamelan – such a lovely interplay. Furthermore, the title track, Flowers, features the addition of a rebab, a traditional bowed instrument, which reels through the piece, netted and taught.

The final two works are strictly gamelan compositions. Ghosts is a a dynamic piece; rife with dexterous euphoria- it well displays the skillset of the percussionists heard on the LP. The closing work, Faint Impressions, is a somber elegy. Demonstrating the fragility and grace possible with the gamelan; sounding almost as an evening piano sonata.

This is album is unique document from an under-represented movement of American New Music. An account of the curious beauty and woven emotions hidden within resonating pieces of metal.

-Sean McCann